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New plant list to help deter garden deer

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Two species of Muntjac deer have been introduced to the UK Wild deer are increasingly being seen in urban areas, with species such as Muntjac and Sika deer expanding their range.When they stray into gardens they are known to strip flowers and foliage, and nibble tree bark.The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) is calling on the public to report damage to garden plants from
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Ocean plastic could triple in decade

[ad_1] Image copyright SPL The amount of plastic in the ocean is set to triple in a decade unless litter is curbed, a major report has warned.Plastics is just one issue facing the world's seas, along with rising sea levels, warming oceans, and pollution, it says.But the Foresight Future of the Sea Report for the UK government said there are also opportunities to cash in on the "ocean economy".They say
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Nerve agent: Who controls the world’s most toxic chemicals?

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images International experts are due in the UK, to test samples of the nerve agent used in the attempted murder of a spy and his daughter. How do they keep track of the world's most toxic chemicals?After collecting samples of the poisons used on Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia, a team from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) will conduct tests, with
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Russian spy: What are Novichok agents and what do they do?

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionChemical weapons expert: 'The Russians will have a lot to answer for'A former Russian spy and his daughter were poisoned by a chemical that is part of a group of nerve agents known as Novichok, UK Prime Minister Theresa May has said.France, Germany and the US have backed the UK's assessment that Russian involvement is the "only plausible explanation", in spite
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Archaeological treasures hiding in London’s mud

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Continuing a tradition popularised by the Victorians, "mudlarkers" scour the foreshore of the Thames in search of historical treasures. Two thousand years of human history are revealed by the low tide on London’s largest archaeological site and we spoke to the foreshore’s mudlarkers about their favourite finds. At around 5am every morning, mudlarkers like Nick Stevens set out to explore the foreshore's offering. Image copyright
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Cracking new ways to fight plastic waste

[ad_1] Image caption Michael Minch-Dixon's fruit snack packets will rot away harmlessly on a compost heap Plastic is one of the world's favourite packaging materials - it's cheap, practical and hard wearing. But its durability is part of the problem. Plastic pollution is now a huge issue and consumers are increasingly demanding greener alternatives. So how are companies responding to the pressure?From chocolate biscuits to toothpaste, razors to cigarettes, low-cost
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Adapt or die: How to cope when the bots take your job

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Will smart virtual assistants take our jobs or make them more fulfilling? Reports that robots, automation and artificial intelligence are going to put millions of us out of work may sound troubling, but should we believe them? That largely depends on whether we're technology optimists or pessimists. In our Future of Work series we look at how jobs might change in the future.The
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Stephen Hawking dies: Scientist’s most memorable quotes

[ad_1] Image copyright Graham CopeKoga Image caption Prof Hawking was still working at Cambridge University at the age of 75 He was trapped in his own body by motor neurone disease, but that did not stop Prof Stephen Hawking help us all get an understanding of the universe.The world renowned physicist has died at the age of 76, leaving the world memorable words on a host of subjects.From the reasons
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Obituary: Stephen Hawking – BBC News

[ad_1] Image copyright AFP Stephen Hawking - who died aged 76 - battled motor neurone disease to become one of the most respected and best-known scientists of his age.A man of great humour, he became a popular ambassador for science and was always careful to ensure that the general public had ready access to his work.His book A Brief History of Time became an unlikely best-seller although it is unclear